Events

Boston Public Schools’ Transportation Challenge Brings Data to Buses

This year, we are partnering with the BPS Experience Lab, the education segment of New Urban Mechanics. This work has focused on visualizing data on student time on buses – length of trip, frequency of use, and conveying this information to headmasters through a dashboard using Power BI.  Through that work (and some recent Globe articles), we learned that 10% of the BPS budget is spent on Transportation. And as identified by the BPS Long Term Financial Planning Initiative and the 10 Big Ideas to Unlock Resources for Student Success, addressing these transportation costs can free up funds to invest in student success. 

BPS is hosting a challenge to better leverage technology to improve routes and bell times with the ultimate goal of reducing transportation costs. In TCE, we sit at the intersection of government, industry and non-profits and this kind of challenge is a terrific use of the data science capacity of the private sector to enable the public sector to better serve constituents and students.    

We are proud to welcome John Hanlon and Will Eger as guest bloggers to tell us more about this challenge. 

— Aimee Sprung, Civic Engagement Manager at Microsoft New England

Last Saturday, over fifty technologists, academics, and transportation industry leaders braved an early Spring snowstorm (only in Boston…) to join us to kick off the first-ever Boston Public Schools (BPS) Transportation Challenge — a data science competition, open to the public, aimed at improving Boston Public Schools’ bus routes and equitably and efficiently balancing our school start times.  We are excited that this innovative public-private hackathon will help us reach — as BPS Superintendent Tommy Chang put it — “a technical solution to a technical problem, using data science to transform our district” in a way that provides the best outcomes for students and families.  We are hopeful that this solution will come from one of the groups in attendance, including students from Northeastern, MIT, BU and Harvard, or from industry powerhouses like FedEx and Uber, but it could just as likely come from someone reading this blog! So… (shameless plug) if you have a knack for solving these kinds of problems then please roll up your sleeves with us and hack away!

The event helped remind us of a number of things. First, as our panelist Andy Rotherham — co-founder of Bellwether consulting — pointed out, “solving school district transportation problems is incredibly hard.” But as John’s remarks highlighted, it’s incredibly important not just for BPS but for Boston as a whole. Reducing the 45,000 miles our buses drive every day wouldn’t just allow us to reinvest in schools, it would also dramatically reduce our carbon footprint. Rebalancing our school start times could potentially free up funds for investment in the classroom while establishing school schedules that work better for families.

The event also illuminated the evolution of our bus routing system, something that is still a work in progress. Mike Hughes, the Assistant Director of BPS Transportation, reminded us of this when he said during the event’s panel discussion: “When Boston Public Schools began creating bus routes in the 1970s, we unrolled large and detailed maps of the city and used push-pins to mark bus stops and connected them with multi-colored string to form unique routes.” Needless to say, our routing and fleet management has evolved dramatically since then. Today, our 650 buses drive  45,000 miles a day and serve 25,000 riders at 231 public, charter, and Parochial schools.

Technology has played an increasing role in planning these routes. Push-pins and strings have been replaced by routing software and digital maps. However, our software still can’t solve this puzzle without placing a significant burden on our excellent drivers, who often have to operate on  inefficient routes, or on our talented transportation staff, who need to troubleshoot and fine-tune the computer-generated routes each summer.

And why is that such an issue? As research into the Traveling Salesman Problem has found, as the number of stops increases the permutations of possible routes grows on factorially (n! – that is, possible permutations increase faster than exponential growth). Therefore calculating the optimal solution by brute force becomes impractical after about 20 stops. And we have 5,000 unique stops, at which our buses stop about 20,000 times per day (the same stops often serve multiple buses).

Things get even more complicated when you factor in the many “rules of the road” that we have to consider when routing. These rules establishing ride-time maximums, bus-stop placement rules, and so on, quickly make this problem nearly impossible to solve.

But there’s hope! With the tremendous advances in digital mapping, the rebirth of the Traveling Salesman problem in academic circles, and the sheer growth in computing power, we believe that now is the time to try to solve this historically unsolvable problem. We think that there just might be someone out there who can develop an algorithm that creates a more optimal solution to both routes and school start times.

As we think about our wish list, we know that this algorithm must be adaptable. We want to better understand the true costs of our various policy choices regarding walk to stop distances, ride times, and student assignment. Given the interconnectedness of our system, we’ve learned that seemingly small changes can snowball into large cost changes. What we want in the end is a tool that not only reliably automates efficient bus routes but also acts as a calculator of sorts, quickly and agilely determining the system-wide impact or cost of various policy scenarios.

Lastly, this is a technical challenge – but one with a very real human component. For 25,000 students, their school day begins when they step on the bus. Therefore this challenge isn’t just about improving efficiency. It is also about ensuring that our students reach schools safely and on time. It is about ensuring that schools start and end at times that work for more families. It is about reinvesting in our schools.

We hope to see your entry in the our routing challenge – make sure you don’t miss the 4/30 deadline and visit our website to learn more!

John Hanlon has served as the Chief of Operations for Boston Public Schools since July of 2015. Prior to becoming COO, John worked for the City of Boston as the Commissioner of Property and Construction Management where he oversaw the management, maintenance, and operations of City Hall and other municipal facilities across Boston. He previously served as Chief Operating Officer for Scholar Athletes, a nonprofit that supports public high school athletes and was the longtime Executive Director at the Dorchester Educational Enrichment Program, a nonprofit that offers mentoring services for middle-school youths. John is a proud Boston Latin School graduate and Dorchester resident, where he lives with his wife and four children. He holds an MBA from Duke University and a BA in journalism from Boston University.

Will Eger is a Strategic Project Manager in Finance for Boston Public Schools, where he works on developing and implementing the district’s Long Term Financial Plan. Prior to this he was in Parthenon’s education practice and was a high school math teacher in Philadelphia. He has written on education for The Atlantic, Ed Week, the Huffington Post, and Higher Education in Review as well as a full length book on the Tea Party. He has an A.B. from Harvard College and a M.S.Ed from the University of Pennsylvania.

Microsoft New England Team NERDs Out at Generation Citizen Trivia for Changemakers

Being in Cambridge for ten years, we know just as well as any local that we’re housed in an area with some of the top minds in the world. With world-class hospitals, universities, politicians, industry leaders, and more surrounding us, it can sometimes be daunting to acknowledge how much intelligence is in every corner of the city.

Generation Citizen, a national organization (and Microsoft partner) that works to inspire civic participation and empower students through civic education, has recognized this bout of intellect and is working to use it for good. For the past four years, our local Generation Citizen (GC) chapter in Massachusetts has utilized this “intelligence problem” at an annual Trivia for Changemakers night. GC’s Trivia for Changemakers brings together teams from Boston industries, pitting them against each other in a night of trivia, where the winners claim the coveted ChangeMaker’s cup.

All proceeds from Trivia For ChangeMakers support Generation Citizen (GC), a 501(c)(3) education nonprofit serving over 3,000 students annually in Boston, Malden, Cambridge, Arlington, Melrose, Lowell, Brockton. GC provides action civics programming in which youth lead community change projects and develop the skills, knowledge, and motivation to become lifelong active citizens. The result is passionate, responsible civic participation that will revive our democracy and the Greater Boston community.

This year, as in years past, Microsoft employees at Microsoft New England R&D Center jumped at the opportunity to participate in GC’s Trivia for Changemakers. Alongside companies like OpenView, Trip Advisor, Bain Capital and ActBlue, Microsoft team members Aimee Sprung, Shannon Felton Spence, Christopher Scranton, Kavitha Scranton, Maggie Schmidt, Ken Danilla and Eric Sprung took on the challenge. Together, they tackled “common sense” questions like “Who is the current president of the Boston City Council?” (Michelle Wu), identified photos of lesser-known presidents, and dove head-first into challenging questions like What former NBA champion and all-star served in the Senate for 18 years and later ran for President? (Bill Bradley). And to our delightful surprise… our team won!

Thank you to Generation Citizen, OpenView, Trip Advisor, Bain Capital and ActBlue, and our amazing team for granting us this year’s bragging rights. See you next year!

Harvard Social Enterprise Conference: Leveraging Technology for Impact

A perennial question for social entrepreneurs is the question of scale. And perhaps the two greatest levers for scaling social enterprises are technology and government. So, it should come as little surprise that the topic of civic technology featured heavily at last month’s Social Enterprise Conference at Harvard! Here, I’d like to share some of the insights presented.

The Harvard Social Enterprise Conference, now in its 19th year, is an initiative of students at Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School of Government, meant to bring together practitioners, students, and academics to discuss the most pressing issues of organizations and society. This year, topics spanned a wide range, and included a variety of panels regarding civic technology. Microsoft’s Aimee Sprung moderated a panel on “Pitching the Public Sector,” while others led panels on mobile technology in the developing world, education technology, and many other topics.

Nearly 1,000 practitioners, students, and academics were part of the 2017 Social Enterprise Conference.

Their conversations were wide-ranging, insightful, and eye-opening for those in the audience who have ever thought of leveraging technology to impact problems they care about. Here are just a few of the lessons they shared:

  • Technology is just a tool. It’s easy to get excited about all of the possible features and capabilities that technology can bring to bear on social issues; it can also be easy to lose track of the fact that technology is only one tool to address these challenges. In schools, even the most advanced learning platform won’t be useful without outstanding educators. Technologists should think of themselves as one part of a larger puzzle in addressing social issues like education, which includes other pieces like process improvements, human capital support, changes in resource use, and more.
  • Governments can be great clients. Governments often get a bad reputation as clients to technology companies and other service providers. But our panelists reminded us that the opposite can also be true: governments can be uniquely outstanding clients. Not only do governments offer unparalleled scale and opportunity to work on important social issues, but there are also marketing and sales advantages. While sales cycles to governments can be long, the turnover rate of existing government clients is very low. And although governments are often unwilling to try brand new solutions, leaders in government talk to one another frequently, making it easy to sell high-quality products that already have a few users.
  • Always keep iterating. Nothing is a substitute for talking to users, understanding their needs, and iterating your technology to meet those needs. This can be especially hard for new startups, who lack both resources and a large client base on which to test new ideas. Panelists offered some creative ways to gain access to those first clients, such as leveraging a university’s brand name (as a student). But mostly, they reiterated how important it is to choose to tackle a problem that you care about enough to get out of the office and into the field.

For more information about the conference, visit our website: www.socialenterpriseconference.org.

Daniel Goldberg is an MBA Candidate at Harvard Business School and an MPP Candidate at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where he focuses on performance improvement, innovation, and service delivery in the public sector. He is the Director of Marketing & Attendee Relations for the Social Enterprise Conference.

Recap: #CivicTechBos — Impact of New Media on Civic Initiatives

While social media began as a way for friends to connect online, its uses have transcended far beyond that original intent. Social media has become a tool for activists, reporters, and unheard populations to connect together and spark new change. And with it, new media has developed on the digital and social spheres to rapidly transform the way civic initiatives take place.

Last night, we hosted our quarterly #CivicTechBos Conversations in Civic Innovation with Venture Cafe, with a focus on how the rapid growth of new media has transformed civic initiatives.

Speakers included:

Miss the conversation? We’ve gathered some highlights from last night’s event on Twitter Moments to keep you up to speed. Join us at our next event this summer!

Microsoft New England Picks: Not-To-Miss Events, April 2017

Happy Spring!

Long nights at Fenway Park… long runs by the Charles River… and long days in civic tech!

Here’s the best of what April has to offer in the Boston Metro area:

April 4

Learn Lab Workshop: Troubleshoot Windows 10

In this workshop, we’ll discuss how Windows 10 integrates with your various devices and how
Windows 10 can help make them better. Then we’ll get our hands on Windows 10, so you can
learn how to explore and modify features that will help you get more done and have fun on your device.

April 5

Accelerate Your Business

Business owners from across the Boston area are invited to attend Microsofts’ Accelerate Your Business event on Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 at the Sheraton Boston Hotel located in the center of downtown Boston.

This complimentary event is a networking, education and best practice sharing experience designed for small and medium sized business owners.

NewCo Boston: Innovation as a Public Resource: The Importance of Placemaking and Community Building

Join us at District Hall, the world’s first free-standing public innovation center, as we discuss the importance of expanding access to entrepreneurial resources, building local innovation communities, and the role of physical spaces and networks in supporting a collaborative innovation ecosystem.

April 6

Talk Data to Me

Talk Data to Me is a monthly event series where we host thought-leaders from the Boston data community to discuss the possibilities that data brings to life.

In April we are partnering with the City of Boston as they launch Analyze Boston, a new open data hub where you can find facts, figures, and maps related to our lives within the city.

April 11

Demo Day Spring 2017: A Celebration of Student Innovation at Northeastern

Demo Day is the presentation of over 20 student ventures that have completed a 6-week program called the Husky Startup Challenge. These ventures have participated in five four-hour bootcamps, attended office hours with coaches, and worked with other Northeastern resources to develop their business plans. The Husky Startup Challenge serves to provide an exciting atmosphere where student-run ventures can engage with real world entrepreneurs to develop their business ideas and create something extremely unique.

Envisioning Holographic Experiences – Mike Pell

Designing for HoloLens is a new frontier for everyone, and definitely requires some experimentation to get right. In this interactive talk, Mike will cover how you can quickly conceptualize and rapidly prototype your holographic experience without using expensive software or needing a Designer’s skillset. You’ll learn some great shortcuts to create, test, and refine your overall holographic experience (with or without coding) to move your ideas forward. Mike Pell- Designer / Envisioneer, The Microsoft Garage

April 12

EdVestors Annual Showcase

EdVestors’ annual Showcase takes place in April and features innovative projects supported by the School Solutions Seed Fund. The event is an opportunity for frontline educators to share their work with a broader audience. Guests in attendance have an opportunity to take one-on-one with Seed Fund project leaders informally, and observe formal presentations from a smaller group of projects on what they’ve learned so far.

April 13

DigiGirlz Boston

DigiGirlz Burlington

This free, 2-hour DigiGirlz Workshop at your Microsoft Store is a fun way for girls in middle school and high school (ages 12-18) to understand why computer science is important, and to use computer science to enhance things they already love doing, both now and in the future. What’s more, they’ll get an inside peek at what it’s like to work in technology; learn how to pursue their passion; and see that a successful career in technology is within their reach. The Workshop includes an inspiring presentation from real, local women in the industry and a Q&A session.

During the second hour, the girls will also get hands-on with our Hour of Code session, which teaches coding fundamentals. At the end of the Workshop, they’ll see cool resources that can be used to learn how to make awesome stuff with computer science.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to meet new role models, get inspired by the pros, and get a hands-on introduction to the world of coding. To join us for our DigiGirlz Workshop, register today.

April 15

DigiGirlz Natick

This free, 2-hour DigiGirlz Workshop at your Microsoft Store is a fun way for girls in middle school and high school (ages 12-18) to understand why computer science is important, and to use computer science to enhance things they already love doing, both now and in the future. What’s more, they’ll get an inside peek at what it’s like to work in technology; learn how to pursue their passion; and see that a successful career in technology is within their reach. The Workshop includes an inspiring presentation from real, local women in the industry and a Q&A session.

During the second hour, the girls will also get hands-on with our Hour of Code session, which teaches coding fundamentals. At the end of the Workshop, they’ll see cool resources that can be used to learn how to make awesome stuff with computer science.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to meet new role models, get inspired by the pros, and get a hands-on introduction to the world of coding. To join us for our DigiGirlz Workshop, register today.

April 19

PULSECHECK: How HACKATHONS Create Companies

Hackathons are more than just a buzzword. These marathon events are the reason that many companies are out tackling the world’s greatest challenges right now.

Join us on April 19th in collaboration with MIT HACKING MEDICINE to hear firsthand how startups emerged from HACKATHONS with viable solutions that are forcing innovation in Healthcare. They’re here to talk about the good, the bad and the unexpected!

April 21-22

#Hack4Democracy

MIT GOV/LAB is organizing We the People/Hack for Democracy to demonstrate MIT’s deep commitment to core American (and human) values of fairness, equality, and openness. In this hackathon, creative and compassionate people from across MIT and the Boston area will come together to tackle the immediate challenges U.S. organizations are now facing to safeguard these values.

April 25

Roxbury Inno Cafe Night

The monthly Café Nights @ RIC are energetic and dynamic events where innovators and entrepreneurs can find one another and collaborate to bring their dreams to reality.

These regular gatherings provide a space for conversations and scheduled programs to inspire a wide range of attendees from different backgrounds and industries to connect, share ideas, and grow their ventures. The Café is open to all members of the innovation community.

April 28

MIT Scaling Development Ventures Conference 2017

The 2017 MIT Scaling Development Ventures conference will feature more than 30 speakers and panelists. Program sessions will include two keynote speakers, social entrepreneur vision talks, a curated conversation, a showcase of MIT Social Ventures, and six afternoon breakout sessions.

Recap — #DigiGirlzRI Inspires High School Girls to Pursue Tech Careers

On Friday, March 17, hundreds of high school girls from Rhode Island gathered at the New England Institute of Technology for a day of all things tech. From media production workshops to 3D Paint tutorials from the Microsoft Store to inspiring speeches by Governor Gina Raimondo, it’s safe to say the event sparked the beginning of several computer science careers.

“Girls and women are half of the world’s population,” Raimondo said to a room packed with DigiGirlz. “They are half of the world’s brains, problem-solvers, leaders. This world cannot solve problems unless they are at the table. That’s why I started programs like CS4RI, partnering with Microsoft and other leaders to offer computer science in every Rhode Island school.”

Backed by Microsoft New England, Computer Science for Rhode Island (CS4RI) is one of the strongest statewide computer science initiatives in the country. Their goal is to have CS taught in every Rhode Island public school by December 2017.

“Digital skills are an increasingly necessary component of success in the workforce—and that applies to women as much as it does to men,” Raimondo said. “Being surrounded by so many young women with such potential at DigiGirlz filled me with optimism, pride and excitement for Rhode Island’s future.”

The fervor from the young women was palpable that day, and behind doors with signs that read “DigiGirlz: No Boys Allowed,” eyes were wide with curiosity. Microsoft Store staff had the girls bringing their imagination to life with 3D Paint, a new program that will be publicly available soon. Meghan Martinez, LTC Alyce Pagliarini and Julie Rinehart led a cybersecurity session, giving the girls valuable advice on how to stay safe online. The five other sessions involved digital media, mechanical engineering, Adobe Photoshop, Unity Program, and Multimedia Web Design.

After lunch, the girls learned about how they could #MakeWhatsNext and brand themselves online with Boston-based social media agency Metter Media. The social media session ended with a slew of giveaways, including the grand prize: a Microsoft Surface. The #DigiGirlzRI hashtag went wild all day long as the girls entered the contests by taking selfies and sharing their #MakeWhatsNext stories.

“The mission of DigiGirlz to provide middle and high school girls an opportunity to explore careers in technology is very important. As a society, we need to break the mold that STEM jobs are ‘jobs for boys’,” said Dr. Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at the New England Institute of Technology. “With the U.S. population being more than 50% female, we need more girls to study technology and to prepare themselves for the many high tech jobs that are or will become available as the baby boomers begin to retire.”

Our next DigiGirlz Day will be in Burlington, MA at our new Sales & Technology Center on Friday, April 28. View more photos from the event below!

NewCo Boston: A Day to See and Be Seen

There are some 300 colleges and universities within 90 miles of Boston, Massachusetts. Our region has the most educated population in the nation, and the state is regularly ranked as number one in innovation capacity.

Massachusetts is poised to lead the next major innovation wave–one characterized by smart, connected machines and devices. Yet, despite a critical mass of education and innovative organizations we are still, paradoxically, coming up short in one critical component: talent. We need to find new ways to get people together to experience what is happening here and to fill them with the kind of pride and enthusiasm that convinces them to keep their talents here upon graduation.

NewCo Boston, April 4-6, can help accomplish this goal. Founded by six-time media and tech entrepreneur John Battelle, NewCo sets out to identify, celebrate, and connect the engines of positive change in our society while fostering trust, storytelling, and true connection between the people driving a new kind of global capitalism. Through intimate sessions, NewCo festivals create lasting engagement and deep, critical connections.

NewCo Boston will feature 80+ innovative companies from across the region opening their doors and inviting the public in for a behind-the-scenes look at companies and conversations with the founders, CEOs and other drivers of innovation in their native habitats. With more than 750,000 possible combinations, each journey can be unique. Each day of this two-day festival concludes with hundreds of fellow NewCo attendees getting together at some of the best networking “meetups” in the region.

What makes NewCo so perfect for Massachusetts?

Tech in Massachusetts has an opportunity to welcome executives, investors, engineers, entrepreneurs, students, media, and generally curious people to come see what’s happening behinds the doors of tech. Whether looking for that new idea or new position, broadening your network and your view of what’s happening across the industry is a smart move.

NewCo is an opportunity to attract and retain more talent, and , as we showcase our amazing local companies on the global NewCo media platform, more people across the 16+ other NewCo cities – from Istanbul to Barcelona to San Francisco – will learn about the great inventors and inventions here, thereby elevating our innovation brand and drawing additional attention and talent to the region.

Finally, NewCo gives us a glimpse into the future. What is being developed today will be the products and services of tomorrow. If you’re looking to network, to find a better job, or to just get a few new ideas, it’s a day worth checking out. Learn more, and join 1,000+ others for the inaugural NewCo Boston festival, by visiting bos.newco.co.

Tom Hopcroft is President & CEO of the Mass Technology Leadership Council, organizer of NewCo Boston. He can be reached at tom@Masstlc.org. 

Tom Hopcroft is President & CEO of the Mass Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC), the region’s leading technology association and the premier network for tech executives, entrepreneurs, investors and policy-makers. A Massachusetts attorney and former adjunct professor at Northeastern University’s College of Business Administration, Mr. Hopcroft founded and led the New England Business and Technology Association which merged with the Mass Software Council in 2005 and later the Mass Network Communications Council in 2009 to form what is today the largest technology organization in the New England with member companies ranging from early stage start-up to global enterprise across the entire tech ecosystem. Hopcroft serves as Chairman of the Fiscal Affairs and Administrative Policy Committee on the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education. He is also on the boards of the MassTLC Education Foundation, MassRobotics, and the Technology Councils of North America. Mr. Hopcroft lives in Winchester, MA, with his wife and two boys.

Make Data Matter — 2017 Hubway Data Challenge

Happy Spring!

How are you celebrating the new season? Spring cleaning? Planning your garden? Getting ready to bike in the warm weather?

How about creating new projects with data?

We’re jumping into spring with Hubway to help launch their 2017 Hubway Data Challenge. First held in 2012, the Hubway Data Challenge is a call for local data enthusiasts to bring Hubway’s trip data to life. Entrants can use trip data from across the Hubway system in Boston, Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline to create unique, analytical, and creative visualizations or other projects that reveal new user patterns about commuting via Hubway.

Where do Hubway users ride? When do they ride? How far do they go? Which stations are most popular? On what days of the week are most rides taken? How do user patterns differ between members and casual riders? How does weather affect usage? These and many other questions can be answered by the ride data.

Entries will be considered for six different categories. Each category will have one winner selected.

Over $7,500 worth of prizes will be awarded. The winning entry in each category will receive this package worth over $1,200, including prizes from Microsoft, General Assembly, b.good restaurant, Cleverhood, Passim, and $250 cash!

How to Enter

Enter your name, email address, phone number, project title, description (up to 600 characters), screenshot, and a self-hosted URL of your visualization or other data-based creation into our online entry form.

And the fun doesn’t stop there — we’ve partnered with Hubway beyond the data challenge for some exciting surprises. Stay posted to our blog and our Twitter to find out more!

Entries must be completed by April 10, 2017, 11:59 PM EST. View the official rules of the 2017 Hubway Data Challenge. Entrants must be at least 18 years old.

#Recap: Boston Area Research Initiative’s 2017 Spring Conference

How is the City of Boston using data to improve its residents’ experience?

Last week, the Boston Area Research Initiative, or BARI, hosted its annual Spring Conference, centered around the theme “Data-Driven Research, Policy, & Practice: Lessons from Boston, for Boston.” Over two days, the conference explored existing work with Boston civic data, a look ahead at the future of data, and possibilities for idea-sharing.

The conference culminated in a data visualization screen-share, where graduate students showcased examples of uses for Boston crime data. These visualizations incorporated crime categorization, neighborhood crime statistics, demographics, and beyond to exemplify the range of approaches one can take to public, open data. We were honored to contribute Microsoft Surface devices to help these students show off their exceptional work.

Miss out on last week’s conference? Catch up with BARI’s pre-recorded session videos here.

Top tweets from the conference (using #BostonData):

Impact of New Media on Civic Initiatives — #CivicTechBos, April 3, 2017

Social media and new approaches to journalism have had broad impact on how civic initiatives are organized and executed. Community and political movements have new tools to attract interested parties and launch campaigns. The last federal election cycle is just one of several examples where various parties worked with and around the traditional journalism channels to get their message out using these new media options. These approaches certainly impact how governments connect with their constituencies, nonprofits engage with their communities, neighborhood movements organize, and civic/political leaders communicate.

We’re hosting a conversation to discuss how new media impacts civic initiatives as part of our Conversations on Civic Innovation series, or #CivicTechBos. Join us for a conversation reviewing the fast-changing world of journalism and social media and how it impacts civic initiatives.

Speakers include:

Schedule:

5:30-6:00 PM – Registration and networking
6:00-7:oo PM – Panel Discussion
7:00-7:30 PM – Q&A
7:30 – 8:30 PM – Post-event networking

Join us Monday, April 3, from 5:30pm-8:30pm at District Hall. RSVP here. To join us online, follow @MSNewEngland, @VentureCafe and the hashtag #CivicTechBos.