Top 5 online safety tips for summer

To help stay safe on your travels this summer, we recommend these Internet safety and privacy tips.

  1. Make sure your laptop or tablet has up-to-date antivirus and antispyware software installed. Windows 8 includes antivirus protection that’s turned on by default. If your computer isn’t running Windows 8, you can download Microsoft Security Essentials for free.
  2. Don’t broadcast vacation plans on your social networking site. If you’re leaving your house unoccupied and at risk for potential burglary, take a few minutes to adjust settings for sharing your location on your social networking site and any apps on your smart phone. If you have kids who go online, make sure they know this, too. For more information, see Use location services more safely.
  3. Lock your mobile phone. Use a four-digit PIN, or a password option, if you have it. Keep it secret. Use our password checker to test your password strength. Also, if you don’t need to store sensitive information on your phone, don’t. Learn more ways to secure your smartphone or learn about the Windows Phone privacy settings.
  4. Avoid typing sensitive information on your laptop using an unsecured wireless connection. If possible, save your financial transactions for a secured home connection. Passwords, credit card numbers, or other financial information are less secure on a public network. If you must enter credit card numbers while using a public network, make sure you see a locked padlock icon in the corner of the browser window and make sure the web address begins with HTTPS (the “S” stands for secure). Get more safety tips for using Wi-Fi.
  5. Your friend probably didn’t just get robbed in a foreign country. If you get an email from a friend who needs you to send him money while he’s on his vacation, be suspicious. A scammer can take over (or hijack) an email account and send an email to you that looks like it’s from someone on your contact list. Find a different way to try to contact your friend to find out if this email really came from him. With Outlook.com (formerly Hotmail), you can now report a friend who you think has been scammed, even if that friend doesn’t use Outlook.com. For more information, see Security features in Outlook.com.
About the Author
Eve Blakemore

Group Manager, Trustworthy Computing

Eve Blakemore is a Group Manager for Trustworthy Computing who delivers consumer guidance around the latest trends in security and privacy. Eve joined Microsoft in 1998 and has worked in corporate and field roles with Microsoft Learning, US Public Sector, Read more »

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1 comments
  1. Anonymous

    i already do this ,but i think that you telling others about this is wonderful!

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